Category : Odd and Even Meter

The study of all odd and even meter in both duple and triple feel. The chants are first demonstrated with accompanying music. Afterward, the chants are played with various click speeds.

Duple Chant in 5 #4 & Duple Chant in 3 #3

This time we look at a chant in alternate ways. In 5, the chant makes most sense. The accompanying music is arranged in a flow that goes against the chant however it comes around at points. When seeing this in 3 the sound of the chant does not change however, the percussive perception alters. The bar line changes as the note values stay the same in 5 and 3.

Triple Chant in 3 #3

Triplet feel is really spelled out with the pedaled opened hats and kick pattern. This creates the 3 against 4. It is critical that you understand 1E&A which is the code we will use from here forth. So in this case which are 3 beats per measure, each beat is divided by 4 which is 1E&A. So counting aloud in ¾ you say, “1E&A, 2E&A, 3E&A, 1E&A, 2E&A, 3E&A” and so on. The hat, kick and ride pattern do not change throughout. So understanding how they anchor is half the battle. Therefore, the hat falls on beats 1, 2, and 3. The kick falls on beats 1, A of 1, & of 2, and E of 3. The ride falls on E of 1, 2, A of 2, and & of 3. The snare pattern is the only part that alters. In the first measure, the snare falls on & of 1 and beat 3. In the second measure, the snare falls on E of 2 and A of 3. When playing 140 BPM and faster, the chant takes on a latin influenced sound.

Duple Chant in 4 #3

Inspired by popular Latin music widely known as Salsa. Not to be mistaken for food LOL! The main ingredient of this chant is the pattern that can be played on hi hat, ride or cowbell. It’s repetitive as the kick and snare although being the mainframe off of which everything hangs. The kick lands on the top of the chant on beat one with two 8th notes making it easy to follow and hear. The snare is on beats 2 and the “e” of 3. Then the kick continues with the “and” of 2, the “a” of 3, the “and” of 4. To get everything in place, get used to chanting “1 e and a, 2 e and a” and so forth.

Duple Chant in 4 #2

The chant can be considered Latin influenced. The key here is to see how the kick drum always starts on the “e” of beat 1. Meaning “1 e and a” The cymbal pattern can be played on cowbell as well. This pattern is the general structure of which everything else plays off of. The downbeat is clear and consistent in the cymbal/cowbell pattern. The kick is on the “e” (or second 16th) of beats 1 and 3. The snare is on the “e” of beats 2 and 4. The bass guitar often accents the second 16th of beat 1.