Duple Chant in 13 #3 (LLLSS)

A new approach is used to remember the form of this chant. Subdividing the frame into three long beats and two short beats creates Long, Long, Long, Short, Short or LLLSS. Always remember: a Long beat is 3 pulses and a Short beat is 2 pulses. This is a much easier way of retaining the shape instead of counting. Although the chart written uses a simple pattern similar to the cymbal and kick drum, the cymbal pr ride can be played various ways as demonstrated in the video with the accompanying music. The key point is to play the chant inside the framework of LLLSS. Once this is mastered at 160BPM, the chant can be performed at faster tempos.

Duple Chant in 11 #2

The chant has a rhythm and blues vibe for sure. Although it is in 11, another way to look at this is as a shape. A Long beat equals 3 pulses and a Short beat equals 2 pulses. All chants and rhythms can be broken into Long and Short beats. It’s a better way to keep track of the shape. We never break down anything into one pulse because that can be infinite. So we only need to limit all rhythms to 2 and 3 pulses. You will understand this as we continue from here on. In this case we have Long, Long, Long, Short as the structure and shape or “LLLS” for short. It is the same as 3, 3, 3, 2. However, it is much easier to retain the letters L and S rather than numbers which always change. This keeps you from counting. It is difficult to count while performing. Instead of counting 11 beats in repetition, visualizing long and short beats is the way to go. This will be useful when performing complex lengthy chants.

Triple Chant in 9 #2

This is a slight change of feel from the previous chant Duple Chant in 9 #2 as it alters the complete perception here. The shape is basically the same as before however, the environment morphs into a swing. All chants can be performed and written in duple or triple feel. The understanding of where the notes fall and the ability to develop the natural shift from duple to triple is within the reach of a solid drummer. The same background music accompanying the drum chant is used specifically using the guitar to help shape the triple feel.

Duple Chant in 9 #2

Weights refers to the specific turning points inside chants. Weights can also be looked at as accents or the overall “skeleton” as I like to call it. Here, the chant is subdivided in 9 by groups of 2/3/3/1 or 2/3/4. The chant neatly fits into the hat and bell-shifting pattern. The weights 2/3/3/1 or 2/3/4 completes the full cycle. The chant begins with a pedaled hat at the top alternating with the bell of the ride cymbal. The top of the chant comes around every two times. Notice how the characteristics change dramatically at only three tempos of 120, 200 and 250 BPM.