Category : Triplet Applications

The study, development and applications of triplet patterns used throughout chants & rhythmic phrases.

Triple Chant in 9 #1

This chant is like looking at 3’s a different way. Three 3’s equal 9. For example 3 x 3 = 9. This is one of the basic ways of understanding this chant. Of course, counting all triplets spells out the 9, but dividing them in 3’s makes it less strenuous on the mind. Playing triplet chants longer than 6 takes two minds: the one that performs and the one that thinks. Yes, this takes repetition. I kept this chant as simple as possible so you can hear the long 9 phrase punctuated in certain areas for rhythmic division. You can also look at this chant as two parts. Looking at the PDF notice how the first part is from the top (beginning) and ends at the first 8th note snare in the second measure. The second half goes from there to the end. That’s another way of looking at this chant.

Triple Chant in 7 #1

This is the triple feel version of Duple Chant in 7 #1. In essence, it is the same chant as Duple Chant in 7 #1 felt with triplets. Technically it is different because of the feel and notation. Demonstrated at 72 BPM you get the relaxed feel to hear where every note drops. I believe performing this chant will help you understand all long odd meter phrasing with a faster ear. In other words, when you are in musical situations where you are given music at the last minute that is unusually triple feel odd meter, you will approach it faster by having repetitious practices of this chant and others similar.

Triple Chant in 6 #2

I like to refer to this chant as semi Afro Cuban. Based off the triple clave, this chant has a swing feel. The hip thing is keeping the hats pedaling on beats 2 and 4. Although this chant is simple in nature, it is quite difficult to master. Once this becomes comfortable to play, try bringing in the cowbell using the 6/8 clave that is the same as the ride pattern in the PDF.

Triple Chant in 6 #1

One of my top warm ups. I developed this during my Reggae Years in my youth. One afternoon I was doing a sound check with some musicians performing reggae music and I came up with this chant. Today I use this chant as one of my warm ups during sound checks. The basic chant enforces an intense solid pocket with the twist of triple feel snare ghost notes not written in the chart. This mimics the sound of slap back delay on hi hat and snare when ghost notes are played on the snare. Or it can be played exactly as written on the chart without ghost notes for independence.