Category : Triplet Applications

The study, development and applications of triplet patterns used throughout chants & rhythmic phrases.

Triple Chant in 3 #2

Simple in nature and complex in reality. The kick lands on the downbeat one time in measure one on the first beat. The hat comes in on beat two in the first measure. The ride cymbal creates a layer of off beats. The snare is always on beats two and three of every measure as in a waltz. Playing this in repetition requires consistent mental focus. The slightest drifting thought can throw any limb off especially the ride cymbal. This is the ultimate chant that builds synchronicity.

Triple Chant in 13 #1

This is the most difficult, simplistic, independent, and synchronistic of chants. Like others, there are numerous ways to understanding the chant. One example: 4 triplets plus one pulse. Another is how the hat and ride stay the same (opposite each other) while the snare and kick shift underneath. The play along track emphasizes the weights of the bass drum demonstrating its simplicity while all other limbs are independent cycles. You can use this chant to work on independence alone. Or you can concentrate on the pedaled hi hat. Whatever methods you choose will help you achieve what few can accomplish and put their minds to.

Triple Chant in 11 #1

This chant is something that should be approached very slowly because it sounds a lot easier than it is to perform. The snare and kick pattern in one bar repeats. The easiest way to look at this is realizing the simplicity of the relationship between the snare and kick. The beginning of the second measure (or repeat) gives the chant what I call a hiccup. When repeating at a tempo around 120 BPM with a click or metronome, each pulse lands on each beat making it easy to know exactly where all the beats are. In other words, the metronome counts every beat. The ride cymbal lands every other beat creating a crossover layer. The hip thing is the turnaround on the second measure with the ride cymbal landing on beat 2 along with the second 8th note on the kick. This takes slow practice and repetition. Then there is the challenge of launching into the chant along with the click to begin with.

Five Elements Full Edition Philadelphia 2014

Screenshot 2015-11-01 15.45.26This close to 3 hour mega feature demonstrates the most important and original approaches to rhythm featuring alto saxophonist Steve Coleman and Five Elements. The name of the band has nothing to do with the members or number of members, but everything to do with Earth, Water, Fire, Wind and Ether. 
Four compositions are demonstrated here “Pi”, “LSLLSSL”, “Drop Kick” and “Wheel Of Nature”. This dual cam workshop shows how Steve applies specific rhythms to forms and how the chords, harmonies, and melodies can be layered in many ways. Expansion is demonstrated on much more than odd meter as the music is multi-layered. The way the band experiments, rehearses, and builds are clearly seen here in the rawest form. There are no smoke and mirrors and definitely no shortcuts. Only hard work, repetitive looping, clapping and singing are the basis for understanding all of the music in its simplest form. There is no other music on the planet such as the music and many approaches of band leader Steve Coleman.