Category : Lessons

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Duple Chant in 13 #2

Double bass drum technique is a combination of thigh and ankle muscle movements that I recommend playing heel up. The chart for this lesson looks insane but is easy to understand when looking at the bass drums as broken triplets. The first note of every triplet is held in place by the snare drum as a ghost note and the second and third notes are played on the bass drum every time. This can be played in any time signature in duple and triple. This triplet figure played between the snare and kick creates a flurry of notes that are played in fixed frame. When hearing this lesson as a duple chant in 13, placement of triplets are easier to grasp. Tempo variations become smoother with repetition.

Triple Chant in 13 #1

This is the most difficult, simplistic, independent, and synchronistic of chants. Like others, there are numerous ways to understanding the chant. One example: 4 triplets plus one pulse. Another is how the hat and ride stay the same (opposite each other) while the snare and kick shift underneath. The play along track emphasizes the weights of the bass drum demonstrating its simplicity while all other limbs are independent cycles. You can use this chant to work on independence alone. Or you can concentrate on the pedaled hi hat. Whatever methods you choose will help you achieve what few can accomplish and put their minds to.

Duple Chant in 13 #1

The chant is pretty simple because of the way it is divided. You can divide any chant any way you want depending on where the weights land. A weight is where things meet or shift. In this case, beat 8 is the shift. A rest occurs on beat 9. The kick comes again on beat 11. That’s one way of looking at it. I demonstrate at 158BPM. As with all the chants, repetition is key at a slow tempo. You can also count a 4 half beats (each beat equals two) and a 5. Instead of a hiccup, this chant has a backup beginning on beat 9. The ride has a unique pattern landing on beats 1, 4, 7, 10, and 12. Of course, counting while playing is difficult and I don’t recommend it. However, examining this gives you a clear understanding of the mechanics. The pedaled hat lands with each snare and fills the gap on beat 9.

Blue Whale/Los Angeles Residency Featuring Steve Coleman & Five Elements December 5, 2015

bluewhalefiveelementsThis performance features Steve Coleman and Five Elements during our three week residency at Blue Whale in Los Angeles. The two and a half hour performance is a raw two cam edit using audio from a portable mp3 recorder. There is no PA system being used on the bandstand and no monitors on the floor. We depend on our dynamics as musicians so we can push the sound to the audience blending at our own levels. Most bands do not do this because they rely on rehearsed music played the same way each night. Not Five Elements. The band is able to shift gears rhythmically, melodically and harmonically giving each night a unique setlist.