Category : Odd and Even Meter

The study of all odd and even meter in both duple and triple feel. The chants are first demonstrated with accompanying music. Afterward, the chants are played with various click speeds.

Triple Chant in 3 #2

Simple in nature and complex in reality. The kick lands on the downbeat one time in measure one on the first beat. The hat comes in on beat two in the first measure. The ride cymbal creates a layer of off beats. The snare is always on beats two and three of every measure as in a waltz. Playing this in repetition requires consistent mental focus. The slightest drifting thought can throw any limb off especially the ride cymbal. This is the ultimate chant that builds synchronicity.

Duple Chant in 3 #2

Performing in 3 is amongst my favorite of meters. The chant is simple in nature. Notice how the kick drum only strikes the down beat in the first measure. The kick pattern plays on the “and” of every other beat. This creates an illusion that does not sound like a three beat phrase. The tempo from slow to moderate changes the musical atmosphere because the faster the tempo, the more the chant sounds unlike 3.

Duple Chant in 13 #2

Double bass drum technique is a combination of thigh and ankle muscle movements that I recommend playing heel up. The chart for this lesson looks insane but is easy to understand when looking at the bass drums as broken triplets. The first note of every triplet is held in place by the snare drum as a ghost note and the second and third notes are played on the bass drum every time. This can be played in any time signature in duple and triple. This triplet figure played between the snare and kick creates a flurry of notes that are played in fixed frame. When hearing this lesson as a duple chant in 13, placement of triplets are easier to grasp. Tempo variations become smoother with repetition.

Triple Chant in 13 #1

This is the most difficult, simplistic, independent, and synchronistic of chants. Like others, there are numerous ways to understanding the chant. One example: 4 triplets plus one pulse. Another is how the hat and ride stay the same (opposite each other) while the snare and kick shift underneath. The play along track emphasizes the weights of the bass drum demonstrating its simplicity while all other limbs are independent cycles. You can use this chant to work on independence alone. Or you can concentrate on the pedaled hi hat. Whatever methods you choose will help you achieve what few can accomplish and put their minds to.