Category : 4 Duple & Triple

Duple Chant in 4 #3

Inspired by popular Latin music widely known as Salsa. Not to be mistaken for food LOL! The main ingredient of this chant is the pattern that can be played on hi hat, ride or cowbell. It’s repetitive as the kick and snare although being the mainframe off of which everything hangs. The kick lands on the top of the chant on beat one with two 8th notes making it easy to follow and hear. The snare is on beats 2 and the “e” of 3. Then the kick continues with the “and” of 2, the “a” of 3, the “and” of 4. To get everything in place, get used to chanting “1 e and a, 2 e and a” and so forth.

Duple Chant in 4 #2

The chant can be considered Latin influenced. The key here is to see how the kick drum always starts on the “e” of beat 1. Meaning “1 e and a” The cymbal pattern can be played on cowbell as well. This pattern is the general structure of which everything else plays off of. The downbeat is clear and consistent in the cymbal/cowbell pattern. The kick is on the “e” (or second 16th) of beats 1 and 3. The snare is on the “e” of beats 2 and 4. The bass guitar often accents the second 16th of beat 1.

Duple Chant in 4 #1

The most common duple feel of 4 can be felt and played in so many ways other than the most popular Westernized ways. You can look at this hi hat part as duple or in groups of 3. The kick beats are 3 beats long as well. The snare lays a long backbeat while landing on a long 2 and 4. Although this chant is identifiable when broken into individual limbs, the sum is quite unique. The best way to learn this chant is simply by hearing and feeling the hi hats against the kick and snare.