Category : Chants & Rhythms

Examples of creating a rhythmic phrase pattern and the examination of its compositional parts.

Triple Chant in 9 #1

This chant is like looking at 3’s a different way. Three 3’s equal 9. For example 3 x 3 = 9. This is one of the basic ways of understanding this chant. Of course, counting all triplets spells out the 9, but dividing them in 3’s makes it less strenuous on the mind. Playing triplet chants longer than 6 takes two minds: the one that performs and the one that thinks. Yes, this takes repetition. I kept this chant as simple as possible so you can hear the long 9 phrase punctuated in certain areas for rhythmic division. You can also look at this chant as two parts. Looking at the PDF notice how the first part is from the top (beginning) and ends at the first 8th note snare in the second measure. The second half goes from there to the end. That’s another way of looking at this chant.

Duple Chant in 9 #1

This chant is styled after what I call the James Brown Backbeat. There’s nothing technical about the word “Backbeat”. It’s just something I associate the snare drum phrase with. When performing this with the Play Along mp3, the music helps bring this style out. It’s limiting to instruct and demonstrate the odd meter of nine without music. As I always suggest, perform this chant at a slow tempo and eventually increase tempo as you feel comfortable through repetition.

Triple Chant in 7 #1

This is the triple feel version of Duple Chant in 7 #1. In essence, it is the same chant as Duple Chant in 7 #1 felt with triplets. Technically it is different because of the feel and notation. Demonstrated at 72 BPM you get the relaxed feel to hear where every note drops. I believe performing this chant will help you understand all long odd meter phrasing with a faster ear. In other words, when you are in musical situations where you are given music at the last minute that is unusually triple feel odd meter, you will approach it faster by having repetitious practices of this chant and others similar.

Duple Chant In 7 #1

If you can imagine a James Brown pocket in 7, this is it. This is a very funky and simple way to play in 7 duple feel. Odd meter is often viewed and assumed as difficult to approach because of its oddness. However, when applying simple familiar phrases to any odd meter one can see how simple odd meter can be approached and performed. This chant was inspired by James Brown’s “Say It Loud I’m Black And I’m Proud”. Continuing this chant repetitively makes this approach to 7 duple feel easily understood.